Queensland Writers Fellowships

Three $15,000 Queensland Writers Fellowships provides support for leading Queensland writers to develop a writing project towards publication over a 12 months.

Applications for the next round of Queensland Writers Fellowships will open in early 2019.

The Queensland Writers Fellowships are supported by Arts Queensland, the State Library of Queensland, and the Queensland Writers Centre. One 2018 Queensland Writers Fellowship was supported by Crowd Giving 2018 donors through the Queensland Library Foundation.

Congratulations to the 2018 Fellows

Michael Gerard Bauer, Gaps and Silences

About the author

Michael Gerard Bauer’s first novel The Running Man was the 2004 CBCA Book of the Year. His other works include the popular Ishmael trilogy, Just a Dog and the Eric Vale series for younger readers illustrated by his son Joe Bauer. His latest YA novel is The Pain, My Mother, Sir Tiffy, Cyber Boy and Me. Michael’s books are currently sold in over forty countries and translated into twelve languages.

About the project

Gaps and Silences is a Young Adult novel that takes place over one long, hot Queensland summer holidays when a 14 year old boy is forced to confront and question the unknowns and mysteries of life, along with his image and understanding of himself, in a way that will change him forever.

Judges’ comments

The panel members were equally drawn to Michael’s project which seeks to explore how we fill the ‘gaps and silences’ we create as we craft and re-craft the stories that help us make sense of our own existence. Queensland’s children’s and YA authors have a reputation for tackling challenging subject matter, and Michael’s project seeks to build on that legacy as well as challenge his own identity as a children’s and YA author.

Laura Elvery, Medallion

About the author

Laura Elvery is a writer from Brisbane. Her work has been published in The Big Issue Fiction Edition, Review of Australian Fiction, Kill Your Darlings and Griffith Review. She has won the Josephine Ulrick Prize for Literature and the Margaret River Short Story Competition, and was awarded a Griffith Review Queensland Writing Fellowship. She has been shortlisted for the Overland NUW Fair Australia, Neilma Sidney and Victoria University prizes. Laura has a PhD in creative writing and literary studies from QUT. Her first collection of stories Trick of the Light was published by UQP in  2018.

About the project

Medallion is a collection of eighteen short stories based on the lives, work and influence of the Nobel Prizes for science that have been awarded to women, beginning with Marie Curie’s first of two medals in 1903. Each story takes a different approach in timeframe, character and narrative separation from the scientists, seen through domestic, physiological and geographical lenses.

Judges’ comments

Laura’s project has an intriguing literary challenge at its heart - build a cohesive short story collection based on the lives of the 18 women who have won the Nobel Prize for science. While a range of new titles highlight the real contribution of women scientists, Laura’s fiction project will explore their imagined reach.

Jackie Ryan, Alfred Russel Wallace: Optimist and Dissenter

About the author

Jackie Ryan holds a PhD in history and political science from The University of Queensland, where she was also an Honorary Research Fellow. She is the author of We’ll Show the World: Expo 88 (UQP 2018), founding editor of the Fanciful Fiction Auxiliary, and creator of the Aurealis Award-winning graphic novel series Burger Force.

About the project

Alfred Russel Wallace was, and seems destined to remain, ‘the other one’. In a historic flash of insight in 1858, he formulated a theory of evolution that was almost identical to one that Charles Darwin had been quietly working on for twenty years. In an equally historic flash—this time of unwelcome enthusiasm—Wallace committed this theory to paper and sent it ‘by the next post to Mr. Darwin, in the full expectation that it would be as new and startling a revelation to him as it had been to myself.’ Darwin was indeed startled. Their papers were delivered as a joint presentation. But joint acclaim did not follow, a fact made most evident in the name by which their theory came to be known: Darwinism. The Victorian scientific community partially erased Wallace’s efforts when it became apparent that he was not interested in science so much as the extent to which information gleaned through it could advance humanity in moral and ethical terms. This book seeks to redress the balance by examining his work and his treatment in the context of his time, and by removing some of the scientific strictures through which his contributions have previously been judged.

Judges’ comments

Jackie has a proven capacity to tackle subjects in which thousands of everyday punters have a personal stake. The panel members are keen to see how the author will step up and into a space with higher stakes and where erasure has played a significant role in defining scientific, public and political discourse, and myth.

Previous recipients of Queensland Writers Fellowships

View past recipients of Queensland Writers Fellowships.